Meet Our 2018 Boy & Girl of the Year

Meet Our 2018 Boy & Girl of the Year

Man & Woman of the Year candidates raise money each year in honor of the Boy & Girl of the Year. They are patient heroes chosen for their inspiring stories and winning attitudes. Each becomes a spokesperson for the thousands of patients who have benefited from LLS resources. The families have pledged to help the candidates and campaign in a variety of ways, most importantly, speaking at and attending events and motivating the candidates. Here's a little more information about our 2018 Girl and Boy of the Year.

 

Sydney%20website.jpg Sydney 
 Diagnosis: Infantile B-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia
 Age: 4 years old

 Sydney’s Story: Sydney was diagnosed with a rare form of Leukemia (Infantile B-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia with MLL-   R) at   the tender age of 6 months old on April 21, 2014. From the day Sydney was born she was always unhappy and seemingly   uncomfortable in her own little body. After a visit to the pediatrician due to a spiked fever, Sydney was immediately admitted to the PICU   fighting for her life. #SuperSydney was in the hospital for the next 42 days, but even then she was only permitted to be home for 3 days   before checking back in to resume chemotherapy. Sydney spent over 50 weeks in the hospital during the first year of treatment. She   endured the placement of a central line, two different ports, a feeding tube, IV nutrition, spinal taps, bone marrow biopsies, breathing   treatments, and so much more.  Sydney’s family sought out a second opinion which moved the whole family to Cincinnati Children’s   Hospital for 5 months. Today, Sydney is 18 months+ off chemo and a spunky 4-year-old.  She attends preschool, loves gymnastics,   wrestling with her sisters, Spiderman and Doc McStuffins.  She wants to be a “heart doctor” or a nurse when she grows up.

 

 

 

Max%20Foor_V4.jpg Max 
 Diagnosis: Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia
 Age: 10 years old

 Story: Max was 6 and a half in July of 2014 when he was diagnosed with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or ALL. Treatment began the   day after his diagnosis and included a spinal tap, steroids and chemotherapy. ALL is the most common form of childhood cancer. While   Max has a very good prognosis, the treatment protocol is one of the longest—totaling a little over three (3) years for boys. Max responded   well to the initial treatment and is in remission, but the treatment continues to prevent the Leukemia from staging a comeback. As such,   Max will continue to receive chemotherapy, steroids and spinal taps until he is almost 10 years old. Everyone calls him “Amazing Max”.   He is inquisitive and knowledgeable about his treatment and gives everyone who comes to his house a check-up. Max enjoys science,   technology, diving and baseball.